Strengthening faith communities and black and minority ethnic voluntary and community sector's capacity to deliver health and social care services

Strengthening faith communities and black and minority ethnic voluntary and community sector's capacity to deliver health and social care services

Funded by the Equality and Human Rights group at the Department of Health (DH), 2006

For further information, contact Ratna Dutt or Tracey Bignall.

What were the aims of the project?

There has been growing interest in including faith organisations in the development and delivery of local services. Faith can motivate wider community action, and faith communities frequently bring resources to, and provide a host of social activities/initiatives for, the wider community.

This project examined the experiences of black and minority ethnic communities and, in particular, faith communities, in providing and receiving health and social care services. We aimed to:

  • explore and summarise research literature in this field
  • ascertain service users’ and providers’ views of their experiences
  • investigate their concerns regarding health and social care funding to the black and minority ethnic voluntary and community sector.

How were these aims fulfilled?

Literature review

The literature review examined the experiences of black and minority ethnic communities and, in particular, faith communities, of:

  • receiving health and social care services
  • providing health and social care services.

Events

London
21 September 2006

Manchester
27 September 2006

Two regional events were held with black and minority ethnic voluntary and community sector groups. Some of these groups were specifically faith-based groups, while others had a general, ‘non-faith’-based focus.

These events provided an opportunity to:

  • disseminate research findings relating to black and minority ethnic communities’ experiences of receiving and providing social care and health services
  • facilitate discussion of these issues and their relevance and validity to the experiences of participating groups
  • identify a 'wish list' of changes
  • report on specific services from the Department of Health for black and minority ethnic and faith community groups
  • share information about accessing grant funding, including Section 64 funding.

Telephone interviews

The interviews attempted to ascertain the views of black and minority ethnic and faith groups on issues including:

  • the main problems in service delivery for black and minority ethnic and faith groups
  • the strengths of black and minority ethnic groups as well as the problems faced by them
  • specific issues around funding from the Department of Health.

What we produced